VMware Workstation – Virtual Ethernet failed – sometimes for good !

I use VMware Workstation as a hypervisor for hosting a few MS Windows guests, which I need in customer projects. As I do not trust Windows systems I sometimes place such guests in different virtual and isolated host-only networks on my workstation or a dedicated server. On other systems I run virtualized Linux server systems for production and tests with the help of KVM/QEMU, LXC and libvirt. Some time ago I learned the hard way that I have to keep track of the different "local" virtual networks more thoroughly. As the VMware side was affected by a misconfiguration in a rather peculiar way I thought this experience might be interesting for others, too.

Host interface to VMware virtual network sometimes not available?

The whole thing coincided with an upgrade of one of my Opensuse workstations. I am always a bit nervous whether and how such an upgrade may impact the VMware WS installation. Quite often I experienced problems with the automatic compilation in the past. In addition the start of some modules lead to secondary errors. However, at a first test VMware WS 14 compiled without problems on a system with Opensuse Leap 15. No wonder, I thought, as the kernel version 4.12 of Leap15 is relatively old.

Then I had to set up a Windows guest. I gave it an IP address within a virtual VMware host-only network, which covered an IPv4 address range of a class C network. VMware uses a kind of virtual bridge to support such a network; normally one associates a virtual network device on the host with it, to which you can assign a certain IP address in the net's address ange. For a C-net VMware uses yyy.yyy.yyy.1 as a default on the host's interface (with yyy.yyy.yyy defining the C-network). In my case the device on the host was named "vmnet6". In the beginning this virtual interface also worked as expected.

However, during the following days I noticed trouble with "vmnet6". In a normal host configuration the VMware WS initialization script ("/etc/init.d/vmware") is started as a LSB service by systemd. The script loads VMware modules and configures the defined virtual networks. Unfortunately, relatively often, my "vmnet6" interface did not become directly available after the start of the Linux host. Some experiments showed however that I could circumvent this problem by some "dubious" action:

I had to enter the "Virtual Network Editor" with root rights and save the already existing virtual network again. Then ifconfig or the ip command enlisted interface "vmnet6" - which also seemed to work normally.

You get a strange feeling when you are forced to remedy something as root .... However, I ignored this problem, which I could not solve directly, for a while. I also noticed that the problem did not occur all the time. This should have rang a bell ... but I was too stupid. Until, yesterday, when I needed to set up another special MS WIN guest in the same address range.

Virtual Ethernet failed

In addition I upgraded to VMware WS Version 14.1.3. The (automatic) compilation of the VMware WS modules on Opensuse Leap 15 again worked without major problems. But, when I manually (re-) started the VMware modules via "/etc/init.d/vmware restart" I saw an error message:

"Virtual Ethernet failed".

Such a message makes you nervous because you assume some real big problem with the VMware modules. However, starting some of my VMware guests (not the ones linked to vmnet6) proved that these guests operated flawlessly and could communicate via their and the hosts network devices. But my "vmnet6" did not appear in the output of "ip a s".

The problem "Virtual Ethernet failed" is reported in some Internet articles; however without a real solution. See e.g. https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1592977; https://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/vmware-workstation-unable-to-start-services-4175547448/; https://communities.vmware.com/thread/264235.

Now, I seriously began to wonder whether and how this problem was related to the already known problem with my virtual device "vmnet6". Some tests quickly showed that the error message disappeared when I eliminated the host-only network related to "vmnet6". Then I tried a new host-only test network with a device "vmnet7" and a different IP range. Also then the "virtual Ethernet" started flawlessly. So, what was wrong with "vmnet6" and/or its IP range? Some residual garbage from old installations? A search for configuration files gave me no better ideas.

vnetlib-log

After a minute I thought: Maybe VMware is right. A look into the log-file "/var/log/vnetlib" revealed:

Oct 14 14:22:49 VNL_Load - LOG_ERR logged
Oct 14 14:22:49 VNL_Load - LOG_WRN logged
Oct 14 14:22:49 VNL_Load - LOG_OK logged
Oct 14 14:22:49 VNL_Load - Successfully initialized Vnetlib
...
Oct 14 14:22:49 VNL_StartService - Started "Bridge" service for vnet: vmnet0
Oct 14 14:22:49 VNLPingAndCheckSubnet - Return value of vmware-ping: 0
...
Oct 14 14:22:50 VNL_CheckSubnetAvailability - Subnet: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx on vnet: vmnet2 is available
...
Oct 14 14:22:49 VNL_CheckSubnetAvailability - Subnet: yyy.yyy.yyy.yyy on vnet: vmnet6 is not available
Subnet on vmnet6 is no longer available for usage, please run the network editor to reconfigure different subnet
Oct 14 14:22:50 VNL_CheckSubnetAvailability - Subnet: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx on vnet: vmnet7 is available
Oct 14 14:22:50 VNL_CheckSubnetAvailability - Subnet: xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx on vnet: vmnet8 is available
.....

(I have replaced real addresses by xxx and yyy.) So, obviously VMware at startup performs a kind of ping check beyond the locally defined virtual devices and networks. Interesting! Why do they ping?

The answer is trivial: When you set up the (virtual) internal bridge for the host-only network you may want to guarantee that the IP-address for the respective host device ("vmnet6") does not exist anywhere else in the reachable network - especially as the host's interface of a host-only network may be used for a host controlled routing (and NAT) of the otherwise isolated VMware guests to the outside world.

Address overlap

And this resolved my problem: A manual ping for the address of the planned host's interface address yyy.yyy.yyy.1 indeed gave me a result. I located the source on another server, where I sometimes perform tests of different virtual network configurations with KVM guests, LXC containers and libvirt. Unfortunately, I had not disabled all of my test networks after my last tests. Due to default DHCP-settings a virtual interface with address yyy.yyy.yyy.1 got established on the test server whenever it was booted. This also explained the finding that the VMware WS problem did not occur always - it only happened when the test server was active in my physical LAN!

Then I actually remembered that I had had a similar problem once in 2016, whilst experimenting with QEMU/VMware-bridge-coupling. (See: Opensuse/Linux – KVM, VMware WS – virtuelle Brücken zwischen den Welten). So, I should have known better and planned my "local" virtual experiments a bit more carefully to avoid address overlaps with other potential virtual networks on different hosts in the LAN.

Stupid me ... The VMware WS startup script was absolutely right to not establish a second address of that kind on my workstation! This lead to the error message "Virtual ethernet failed" - which in my opinion should include a bit more detailed information or a hint to a log-file. But the fault clearly was on my side: One should not think in terms of a local host environment when using VMware WS for virtual networks, but consider the global network configuration.

Still, the whole VMware handling of a possible IP address overlap left me a bit puzzled :

Why can you by saving the questionable virtual network again establish a host interface despite the fact that another interface with the same address is running somewhere in the network? OK, you are root when you do it - but why is no warning given at this point? (VMware could do a ping check there, too .... )

A second question also worried me: Why did the existence of two devices with the same IP-address did not lead to more chaos in the network? One reason probably was that I had allowed pinging but no general TCP-transport to the virtual device on the test server. And explicit routes were otherwise defined properly on the different hosts. However, I could bet on some problems on the ARP-level when the test server was up and running. Anyway - such a basic misconfiguration in a a network may lead to security holes, too, and should, of course, be avoided.

A third question that came up for a second was: How do you avoid overlaps in case one wants to assign KVM/QEMU-guests and VMware guests IP addresses within the same network address space on one and the same virtualization host? Such a scenario is not at all as far fetched as it may seem at first sight. One reason for such a configuration could be the EU GDPR (DSGVO):

If you need to guarantee a customer confidentiality and are nevertheless forced to use a standard MS Windows client, you have a problem as MS may in an uncontrollable way transfer data to their own servers (outside the EU). Just read the license and maintenance agreements you sign with the operation of a standard Win 10 client! Therefore, you may want to isolate such clients drastically and only allow for communication with certain IP-addresses on the Internet (and NOT with MS servers). You may allow communication with some (virtualized) Linux machines in the same sub-network and one of them may serve as a gateway and perimeter firewall with strict filters. You can build up such scenarios by coupling a QEMU-virtual bridge to a VMware virtual bridge. At the same time, however, you need full control over the DHCP-systems on both sides (besides a bit of scripting) to avoid address overlaps. But this is actually easy: the DHCP-control files on the VMware side are found under the directory "/etc/vmware/vmnetX/dhcpd", with "X" standing for a virtual VMware interface number. On the QEMU side you find the files at "/etc/libvirt/qemu/networks". There you can control your IP assignments (or even no assignments for some special interfaces). Ok, but this is the beginning of another story.

Conclusion

Never think "local" or host based when working with virtual networks! Always include local virtual test networks in your documentation of your global network landscape! An do not always just accept the standard address assignment for host interfaces to virtual networks without thinking.

Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host – IV – guestmount, virt-filesystems, qemu-img

In den vorhergehenden Beiträgen dieser Serie

Mounten eines vmdk Laufwerks im Linux Host – I – vmware-mount
Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host – II – Einschub, Spezifikation, Begriffe
Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host – III – qemu-nbd, loop-devices, kpartx

hatten wir gesehen, dass der Zugang zu komplexen vmdk-Images mit Snapshots, Extents und Base-Disk Files eine Kontrolle über das vmdk-Format und die zugehörige Block-Adressierung erfordert. Die notwendigen Informationen sind ggf. über mehrere Files in unterschiedlichen Ästen des Filesystems eines Hosts verteilt; eine Verwendung unter Linux erfordert daher einen zwischengeschalteten Layer:

  • Das Tool "vmware-mount" produziert vor dem automatischen Mounten auf ein Zielverzeichnis aus den verstreuten Dateien des vmdk-Images zunächst ein zusammenhängendes "flat"- oder "raw"-File. Die darin beherbergten Partitionen/Filesysteme können wir dabei zur Not auch selbst mit fdisk/parted erkennen und als Loop-Devices mounten. Dabei sind Offset-Angaben zu beachten.
  • Das Tool "qemu-nbd" interpretiert komplexe vmdk-Images ebenfalls korrekt und bietet dem User über ein Kernelmodul einen Block-Layer an: das Disk-Image wird als Ganzes als Block-Device angeboten. Zudem werden enthaltene Filesysteme automatisch erkannt und ebenfalls als Block-Devices angeboten, wenn das Modul entsprechend parametriert wurde. Die im Block-Device der gesamten Disk enthaltenen Filesysteme können alternativ aber auch über Loop-Devices angesprochen werden.

Wir hatten zudem erkannt, dass man beim Einsatz der bisher besprochenen Tools bzgl. der resultierenden Zugriffsrechte aufpassen muss:

Ein automatisches Mounten mit vmware-mount geht mit Zugriffsrechten viel zu freizügig um. Eigene Mount-Befehle sind dagegen mit entsprechenden Optionen zu berechtigten Usern und Zugriffsmasken zu versehen - soweit möglich.

Wir stellen nun ein Tool vor, dass Sicherheitsaspekte beim Mounten von Disk-Images auf Hosts von Haus aus noch etwas ernster nimmt und FUSE nutzt, um Filesysteme von Disk-Image-Dateien unter Linux in handlicher Weise bereit zu stellen: guestmount.

Flankierend betrachten wir in diesem Artikel zudem zwei Tools, die es einem erlauben, die Snapshot- und Extent-Verteilung eines vmdk-Images sowie die enthaltenen Filesysteme vorab auch ohne Mount-Prozess zu ermitteln: qemu-img und virt-filesystems. Für den Einstieg in forensische Arbeiten mit unbekannten, komplexen vmdk-Images sind diese Kommandos zusammen mit Zeitstempelinformationen durchaus wertvoll.

Vorsicht bei Experimenten

Auch im Falle von "guestmount" gilt: Konkurrierende Schreibzugriffe auf das Disk-Image sind zu vermeiden. Das bedeutet, dass die virtuelle (VMware-, QEMU-, Virtualbox-) Maschine, die das vmdk-Image normalerweise als Disk nutzt, abgeschaltet sein muss. Zur Sicherheit Kopien der Disk-Images anlegen und ggf. nur "read only" mounten.

Notwendige Pakete

"guestmount" nutzt die libguestfs-Bibliothek. Das Kommando gehört zu einem ganzen Set von Tools, die seit 2009 für Virtualisierung (im Besonderen mit QEMU) entwickelt und optimiert wurden. Siehe hierzu die ganz unten angegebenen Links. Unter Opensuse benötigt man für "libguestfs" die Pakete libguestfs0, guestfs-tools, guestfs-data und ggf. perl-Sys-Guestfs. Installieren sollte man in jedem Fall auch "qemu-tools".

Unter Debian/Kali gibt es ebenfalls eine ganze Reihe von Paketen (s. den Link unten); das Notwendigste wird aber im Zuge der Installation von "libguestfs-tools" bereitgestellt. Das zudem nützliche Paket "qemu-utils" hatten wir schon im letzten Artikel erwähnt.

Interessant ist (unter Opensuse) im Besonderen das Paket guestfs-data: Die Beschreibung dieses RPM-Pakets zeigt, dass es eine minimale virtuelle Maschine (nach dem Supermin-Muster) beinhaltet, die offenbar von libguestfs-Anwendungen verwendet wird - wie wir sehen werden, auch von "guestmount".

Bevor man "guestmount" einzusetzt, lohnt es sich, zunächst ein paar Informationen über das vmdk-Image und enthaltene Filesysteme zu sammeln.

Beschaffen von Infos zu Snapshots, Extents in vmdk-Disk-Image

Ein wichtiges Tool, um sich Informationen zur Datei-Struktur (Snapshot- und Extent-Files) von Disk-Images für virtuelle Maschinen zu verschaffen, ist "qemu-img". Ein Auszug aus der man-Seite besagt:

qemu-img allows you to create, convert and modify images offline. It can handle all image formats supported by QEMU. .... The following commands are supported: ....
...
info [--object objectdef] [--image-opts] [-f fmt] [--output=ofmt] [--backing-chain] filename
....
snapshot [--object objectdef] [--image-opts] [-q] [-l | -a snapshot | -c snapshot | -d snapshot] filename
...
	snapshot is the name of the snapshot to create, apply or delete
...
    	-l  lists all snapshots in the given image
...
info [-f fmt] [--output=ofmt] [--backing-chain] filename
           Give information about the disk image filename. Use it in particular to know the size reserved on disk which can be different from the displayed size. If VM snapshots are stored in the disk image, they are displayed too. The command can output in the format ofmt           which is either "human" or "json".

           If a disk image has a backing file chain, information about each disk image in the chain can be recursively enumerated by using the option "--backing-chain".
....

 
Ähnliche Informationen gibt uns auch "qemu-img -h". Der Wiki-Link zu "Qemu/Images" unten bestätigt, dass "qemu-img" die vmdk-Formate 3,4 und 6 unterstützt.

Der Ausdruck "backing-chain" erinnert den aufmerksamen Leser natürlich sofort an die "Link-Kette" für vmdk-Snapshots, die wir im zweiten Artikel dieser Serie angesprochen hatten.
Wer meinen letzten Artikel gelesen hat, weiß, dass ich ein vmdk-Test-Image habe, das drei Snapshots aufweist und dessen Base-Disk-File in einem anderen Verzeichnis liegt als die Dateien zu den Snapshots. Damit wollen wir "qemu-img" mal testen. (Ich mache das nachfolgend als User root; erforderlich ist das bei hinreichenden Zugriffsrechten auf die Image-Dateien aber keinesfalls.)

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-img info Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk
image: Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk
file format: vmdk
virtual size: 4.0G (4294967296 bytes)
disk size: 24M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk
Format specific information:
    cid: 4245824591
    parent cid: 1112365808
    create type: twoGbMaxExtentSparse
    extents:
        [0]:
            virtual size: 4261412864
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000003-s001.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE
        [1]:
            virtual size: 33554432
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000003-s002.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE

Wir sehen hier offenbar den Beginn der Snapshot-Historie: Der dritte VMware-Snapshot "Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk", der bislang offenbar nur geringe Veränderungen aufnehmen musste, setzt auf auf einem "backing file" auf: Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk. Wir sehen damit allerdings noch nicht die gesamte Snapshot-Historie (s.u.).

Dafür erkennen wir aber, dass der Inhalt pro Snapshot über 2 sparse Extents verteilt ist. Die zugehörige CID-Information ist - wie wir aus dem 2-ten Artikel der Serie wissen - im Deskriptor-File des Snapshots beinhaltet. Insgesamt gilt, dass "qemu-img" im Fall von vmdk_Images im Wesentlichen den Inhalt der Deskriptor-Dateien darstellt.

Übersicht über die gesamte Backing-Chain
Wollen wir die gesamte Backing-Chain - also im Fall von vmdk-Images die vollständige Snapshot-Historie - sehen, müssen wir beim Kommando zusätzlich eine Unteroption "- -backing-chain" angeben:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-img info --backing-chain Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk
image: Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk
file format: vmdk
virtual size: 4.0G (4294967296 bytes)
disk size: 24M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk
Format specific information:
    cid: 4245824591
    parent cid: 1112365808
    create type: twoGbMaxExtentSparse
    extents:
        [0]:
            virtual size: 4261412864
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000003-s001.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE
        [1]:
            virtual size: 33554432
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000003-s002.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE

image: Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk
file format: vmdk
virtual size: 4.0G (4294967296 bytes)
disk size: 1.1M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: Win7_x64_ssdx-000001.vmdk
Format specific information:
    cid: 1112365808
    parent cid: 3509963510
    create type: twoGbMaxExtentSparse
    extents:
        [0]:
            virtual size: 4261412864
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000002-s001.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE
        [1]:
            virtual size: 33554432
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000002-s002.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE

image: Win7_x64_ssdx-000001.vmdk
file format: vmdk
virtual size: 4.0G (4294967296 bytes)
disk size: 1.0M
cluster_size: 65536
backing file: /vmw/Win7/Win7_x64_ssdx.vmdk
Format specific information:
    cid: 3509963510
    parent cid: 3060125035
    create type: twoGbMaxExtentSparse
    extents:
        [0]:
            virtual size: 4261412864
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000001-s001.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE
        [1]:
            virtual size: 33554432
            filename: Win7_x64_ssdx-000001-s002.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE

image: /vmw/Win7/Win7_x64_ssdx.vmdk
file format: vmdk
virtual size: 4.0G (4294967296 bytes)
disk size: 2.2G
cluster_size: 65536
Format specific information:
    cid: 3060125035
    parent cid: 4294967295
    create type: twoGbMaxExtentSparse
    extents:
        [0]:
            virtual size: 4261412864
            filename: /vmw_win7/Win7_x64_ssdx-s001.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE
        [1]:
            virtual size: 33554432
            filename: /vmw_win7/Win7_x64_ssdx-s002.vmdk
            cluster size: 65536
            format: SPARSE
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test #   

 
"qemu-img" stellt uns eine über mehrere Filesystem-Orte verteilte Snapshot- und Extent-Zusammensetzung eines vmd-Images konsolidiert dar. Sprich: Durch die Option "- - backing-chain" werden alle Deskriptor-Dateien zu allen Snapshots ausgelesen und in der richtigen Reihenfolge ausgegeben. Das ist zumindest im Falle mehrerer Disks und vieler Snapshots recht nützlich, zumal wenn unterschiedliche Disks eines VMware-Gastes sehr unterschiedliche Snapshot-Historien aufweisen sollten. Was einem in der Praxis durchaus unter die Finger kommt.

Leider muss der Linux-User aber von vornherein wissen, in welchem Verzeichnis man den jüngsten Snapshot (mit der höchsten Nummer im Namenszusatz) und die zugehörige Deskriptor-Datei findet. Die Verlinkung der vmdk-Snapshot-Chain erfolgt nur nach unten in Richtung Base-File - also einseitig.

Die im "type twoGbMaxExtentSparse" angegebenen 2GB für die Extends muss man unter aktuellen Linux-Systemen nicht zu ernst nehmen; faktisch operiert z.B. die VMware WS 14 mit wachsenden 4 GB Extents.

Übrigens:

Da Snapshots in vmdk-Images über eine Backing-Chain (im VMware-Sprech: eine Link-Chain) realisiert werden, liefert uns das Kommando "qemu-img snapshot -l" keine passende Informationen; die Snapshots sind anders als etwa in qcow2-Disks nicht intrinsischer Teil des/der primären Image-Files.

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-img snapshot -l  Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Beschaffen von Informationen zu Filesystemen in einem vmdk-Disk-Image

Das obige Kommando hat uns noch nicht gezeigt, welche Partitionen/Filesysteme in der Disk aktuell beheimatet sind. Diese Information benötigen wir aber für die Anwendung von "guestmount". Hier hilft die "libguestfs" mit dem Tool "virt-filesystems" weiter:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # virt-filesystems -a Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk -l
Name       Type        VFS   Label   Size        Parent
/dev/sda1  filesystem  ntfs  Volume  2718957568  -
/dev/sda2  filesystem  ntfs  Volume  1572864000  -

oder - für die zusätzliche Ausgabe von Partitionen:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # virt-filesystems -a Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk --all --long --uuid -h
Name      Type       VFS  Label  MBR Size Parent   UUID
/dev/sda1 filesystem ntfs Volume -   2.5G -        00E60BCAE60BBF42
/dev/sda2 filesystem ntfs Volume -   1.5G -        42A048ACA048A7ED
/dev/sda1 partition  -    -      07  2.5G /dev/sda -
/dev/sda2 partition  -    -      07  1.5G /dev/sda -
/dev/sda  device     -    -      -   4.0G -        -

Gut, nicht wahr?
Hinweis:

Die Bezeichnungen "/dev/sda1", "/dev/sda2" haben nichts mit evtl. existierenden, gleichnamigen Devices des aktuellen Hosts zu tun. Die Bezeichnungen beziehen sich ausschließlich auf interne Partitionen des Disk-Images.

Zu weiteren Optionen, wie etwa "--extra" für die Anzeige weiterer nicht mountbarer Filesysteme, siehe die man-page zum Kommando.

guestmount - bequemes Mounten vorhandener vmdk-Filesysteme

Mit dem obigen Wissen ausgestattet, können wir nun endlich guestmount einsetzen. Die Kommandostruktur ist für den Normalfall recht einfach

guestmount -a img-file -m /dev/sdax [--ro] mount-point-im-Linux-host

Wollen wir also in unserem Beispiel das zweite Filesystem mounten, so ist Folgendes anzugeben:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # guestmount -a Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk  -m /dev/sda2  --ro /mnt3 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt3/
$RECYCLE.BIN/                           System Volume Information/
Cosmological_Voids/                     mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi
Muflons/                                ufos/
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt3/ufos/
total 5
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 Mar 31 15:26 .
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4096 Mar 28 20:25 ..
-rwxrwxrwx 1 root root   18 Mar 31 15:26 ufo.txt
-rwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 Mar 31 14:02 xufos
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test #
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # guestunmount  /mnt3 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Hinweise:

  • Zum Entfernen eines Mounts muss man das Kommand "guestunmount" verwenden.
  • Die Option "--ro" sorgt dafür, dass "read-only" gemountet wird.

guestmount - Möglichkeit zum gestaffelten Mounten

Es gibt weitere Optionen und Einsatzmöglichkeiten für "guestmount", die man der man-Seite entnehmen kann. Die anderen Möglichkeiten sind aber eher für Linux/Unix-Filesysteme im vmdk-Image geeignet. Auf eine Möglichkeit - nämlich die eines geschachtelten Mounts in einem Schritt - möchte ich aber doch hinweisen.

Eines meiner mit VMware virtualisierten Windows 7-Testsysteme weist ein (freies) Verzeichnis "mounts/mnt2" auf. Der aktuelle Snapshot des Hauptsystems mit dem Win7-OS heißt "Win7_x64-cl1-000011.vmdk". Dann kann man etwa Folgendes machen:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # guestmount -a Win7_x64-cl1-000005.vmdk -m /dev/sda1 -a Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk  -m /dev/sdb2:/mounts/mnt2  --ro /mnt2 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2/
total 4194272
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root          0 Jan 25  2014 $Recycle.Bin
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      12288 Mar 20 18:05 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root       4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
....
-rwxrwxrwx  1 root root       8192 Aug 23  2012 BOOTSECT.BAK
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root       4096 Sep 23  2016 Boot
lrwxrwxrwx  2 root root         60 Jul 14  2009 Documents and Settings -> /sysroot/Users
lrwxrwxrwx  2 root root         60 Aug 23  2012 Dokumente und Einstellungen -> /sysroot/Users
....
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root       4096 Jan 25  2014 Users
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      24576 Apr  8 11:43 Windows
...
-rwxrwxrwx  1 root root 4294434816 Apr  8 11:41 pagefile.sys
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root       4096 Mar 27 19:37 mounts
...

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2/mounts/mnt2/ufos/
total 5
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 Mar 31 15:26 .
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root 4096 Mar 28 20:25 ..
-rwxrwxrwx 1 root root   18 Mar 31 15:26 ufo.txt
-rwxrwxrwx 1 root root    0 Mar 31 14:02 xufos

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2/mounts
total 28
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root  4096 Mar 27 19:37 .
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root 12288 Mar 20 18:05 ..
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root     0 Mar 22 10:30 mnt
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root  4096 Mar 28 20:25 mnt2
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   216 Mar 27 19:21 mnt3 -> /sysroot/.NTFS-3G/Volume{c5......}
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root   216 Mar 27 19:37 mnt4 -> /sysroot/.NTFS-3G/Volume{a4......}

Nett, nicht wahr? Man beachte, dass die Partitionen des zweiten mit der Option "-a" bereitgestellten Images mit "/dev/sdbx" bezeichnet werden. Einige Informationen wurden im obigen Auszug mit "...." ersetzt.

Die Frage ist halt, in wieweit ein solcher geschachtelter Mount mit Windows-Systemen Sinn macht. Man könnte einwenden, dass auch unter Windows Disks in den Verzeichnisbaum gemountet werden können. Stimmt auch - nur wird ein solcher Mount viel umständlicher realisiert als unter Linux. Im obigen Beispiel zeigen die letzten Zeilen gerade solche belegten Mount-Punkte. Die dortigen Windows-Verweise führen aber ohne gestartetes System ins Nirwana. So funktioniert Folgendes leider nicht:

            
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test #  guestmount -a Win7_x64-cl1-000005.vmdk -m /dev/sda1 -a Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk  -m /dev/sdb2:/mounts/mnt4  --ro /mnt2 
libguestfs: error: mount_options: mount: /mounts/mnt4: No such file or directory
guestmount: '/dev/sdb2' could not be mounted.
guestmount: Did you mean to mount one of these filesystems?
guestmount:     /dev/sda1 (ntfs)
guestmount:     /dev/sdb1 (ntfs)
guestmount:     /dev/sdb2 (ntfs)

Man kann daher - auch wennn man schon weiß, wie bestimmte NTFS-Partitionen in das Windows-Hauptlaufwerk gemountet werden - diese Verhältnisse unter Linux nicht direkt nachstellen.

Auf ähnliche Einschränkungen stößt man bzgl. der Guestmount-Option "-i" für vmdk-Images. Auch eine automatische Aufdröselung von Mount-Punkten funktioniert mit NTFS-Filesystemen nicht. Das ist aber nicht so schlimm; Forensiker können die wahre Struktur eine Windows-Maschine über die Registry (in Subverzeichnissen von Windows/System32/config) und Infos in weiteren Verzeichnissen auslesen.

guestmount - Sicherheit über Einsatz einer minimalen virtuellen QEMU-Maschine

Der Leser erinnert sich sicher an die mahnenden Worte von D.P.Berrange in
https://www.berrange.com/tags/libguestfs/
bzgl. der Risiken beim Mounten von Disk-Images virtualisierter Gastsysteme auf einem Linux-Host. Weitere Hinweise auf solche Risiken liefern die Entwickler von libguestfs unter folgendem Link:
http://libguestfs.org/guestfs-security.1.html.

Um evtl. Problemen mit manipulierten Disk-Images und ihren Filesystemen vorzubeugen, operiert "libguestfs" mit einer virtuellen QEMU-Maschine im Hintergrund. Ich zitiere aus dem Text des eben genannten Links:

"We run a Linux kernel inside a qemu virtual machine, usually running as a non-root user. The attacker would need to write a filesystem which first exploited the kernel, and then exploited either qemu virtualization (eg. a faulty qemu driver) or the libguestfs protocol, and finally to be as serious as the host kernel exploit it would need to escalate its privileges to root. Additionally if you use the libvirt back end and SELinux, sVirt is used to confine the qemu process. This multi-step escalation, performed by a static piece of data, is thought to be extremely hard to do, although we never say ‘never’ about security issues."

Hervorhebung durch mich. Leute, dieser Ansatz gefällt mir! Dennoch funktioniert er auf einem Opensuse-System ohne SE-Linux, aber mit AppArmor, leider nicht vollständig (s.u.).

Können wir die virtuelle QEMU-Maschine (die übrigens von der Supermin-Gattung ist) sehen? Ja das geht; z.B. als unpriviligierter User "myself":

myself:/vmw/ssdx> ps aux | grep qemu
myself      18986  0.0  0.0  10564  1640 pts/8    S+   12:22   0:00 grep --color=auto qemu
myself:/vmw/ssdx> guestmount -a Win7_x64_ssdx.vmdk  -m /dev/sda2  --ro /mnt/vmdk                                                        
myself:/vmw/ssdx> ps aux | grep qemu
myself      19002 19.8  0.3 1534676 247408 pts/8  Sl   12:22   0:00 /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 -global virtio-blk-pci.scsi=off -nodefconfig -enable-fips -nodefaults -display none -machine accel=kvm:tcg -cpu host -m 500 -no-reboot -rtc driftfix=slew -no-hpet -global kvm-pit.lost_tick_policy=discard -kernel /var/tmp/.guestfs-1553/appliance.d/kernel -initrd /var/tmp/.guestfs-1553/appliance.d/initrd -device virtio-scsi-pci,id=scsi -drive file=/tmp/libguestfsCrlFc9/overlay1,cache=unsafe,format=qcow2,id=hd0,if=none -device scsi-hd,drive=hd0 -drive file=/var/tmp/.guestfs-1553/appliance.d/root,snapshot=on,id=appliance,cache=unsafe,if=none -device scsi-hd,drive=appliance -device virtio-serial-pci -serial stdio -device sga -chardev socket,path=/tmp/libguestfsCrlFc9/guestfsd.sock,id=channel0 -device virtserialport,chardev=channel0,name=org.libguestfs.channel.0 -append panic=1 console=ttyS0 udevtimeout=6000 udev.event-timeout=6000 no_timer_check acpi=off printk.time=1 cgroup_disable=memory root=/dev/sdb selinux=0 TERM=xterm-256color                                                                                                                                      
myself      19021  0.0  0.0  10564  1648 pts/8    S+   12:22   0:00 grep --color=auto qemu
myself:/vmw/ssdx> guestunmount /mnt/vmdk
myself:/vmw/ssdx> ps aux | grep qemu
myself      19047  0.0  0.0  10564  1652 pts/8    S+   12:22   0:00 grep --color=auto qemu
myself:/vmw/ssdx> 

Man beachte die leider erfolgte Deaktivierung des Security Models durch den Parameter "selinux=0"; auf meinem Opensuse-System läuft AppArmor.

Immerhin: Es ist gut, dass eine virtuelle Maschine bei der Ausführung der guestmount- oder generell von libguestfs-Befehle zwischengeschaltet wird. Wie genau die Übergänge zwischen Fuse auf dem Linux-Host, dem Starten einer QEMU-Maschine, dem nachfolgenden Mount-Prozess innerhalb der QEMU-Machine (wiederum unter Einbeziehung von FUSE für das dortige Mounten des entdeckten Filesystems, z.B. NTFS) und dem Re-Export des schließlich emulierten Block-Devices auf den Host - genauer: auf den dortigen Mount-Point - funktioniert, muss uns als Anwender - Gott sei Dank - nicht interessieren. Aus dem Jahr 2009 stammt vom Erfinder folgende Darstellung der Prozess-Kette:

            
Linux VFS (in the host) -> fuse -> guestmount process -> libguestfs -> XDR protocol over a TCP socket -> host kernel -> QEMU’s SLIRP stack -> guest kernel -> guestfsd -> Linux VFS (in the guest) -> fuse -> mount-ntfs-3g -> Windows block device -> QEMU (emulating the block device) -> host kernel -> real block device

Siehe: https://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/fuse-support-for-libguestfs/

Teile davon dürften heute wohl noch stimmen. Habe aber keine genaue Ahnung ... 🙂 .

Ein paar Infos zur virtuellen libguestfs-QEMU-Maschine

Man kann das Starten der virtuellen Maschine auch an "libvirtd" deligieren. Das hat den Vorteil, dass man mittels per virsh-Kommandos ein paar Informationen über die virtuelle QEMU-Maschine ermitteln kann. Notwendig zum Involvieren von "libvirt" ist das Setzen einer Umgebungsvariablen für die Shell des unpriviligierten Users:

export LIBGUESTFS_ATTACH_METHOD=libvirt

Führen wir dann wieder "guestmount" aus, sehen wir, dass der Aufruf der virtuellen Maschine mit anderer Parametersetzung erfolgt:

myself:/vmw/ssdx> export LIBGUESTFS_ATTACH_METHOD=libvirt
myself:/vmw/ssdx> guestmount -a Win7_x64_ssdx.vmdk  -m /dev/sda2  --ro /mnt/vmdk
myself:/vmw/ssdx> ps aux | grep qemu
myself      13201  5.2  0.3 1927592 261572 ?      Sl   17:20   0:01 /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 -machine accel=kvm -name guest=guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz,debug-threads=on -S -object secret,id=masterKey0,format=raw,file=/home/myself/.config/libvirt/qemu/lib/domain-1-guestfs-7pup8sjqcmva/master-key.aes -machine pc-i440fx-2.9,accel=kvm,usb=off,dump-guest-core=off -cpu host -m 500 -realtime mlock=off -smp 1,sockets=1,cores=1,threads=1 -uuid 61273dde-6a1c-4c0a-be8d-ae06494041aa -display none -no-user-config -nodefaults -device sga -chardev socket,id=charmonitor,path=/home/rmo/.config/libvirt/qemu/lib/domain-1-guestfs-7pup8sjqcmva/monitor.sock,server,nowait -mon chardev=charmonitor,id=monitor,mode=control -rtc base=utc,driftfix=slew -global kvm-pit.lost_tick_policy=delay -no-hpet -no-reboot -no-acpi -boot strict=on -kernel /var/tmp/.guestfs-1553/appliance.d/kernel -initrd /var/tmp/.guestfs-1553/appliance.d/initrd -append panic=1 console=ttyS0 udevtimeout=6000 udev.event-timeout=6000 no_timer_check acpi=off printk.time=1 cgroup_disable=memory root=/dev/sdb selinux=0 TERM=xterm-256color -device piix3-usb-uhci,id=usb,bus=pci.0,addr=0x1.0x2 -device virtio-scsi-pci,id=scsi0,bus=pci.0,addr=0x2 -device virtio-serial-pci,id=virtio-serial0,bus=pci.0,addr=0x3 -drive file=/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/overlay1,format=qcow2,if=none,id=drive-scsi0-0-0-0,cache=unsafe -device scsi-hd,bus=scsi0.0,channel=0,scsi-id=0,lun=0,drive=drive-scsi0-0-0-0,id=scsi0-0-0-0,bootindex=1 -drive file=/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/overlay2,format=qcow2,if=none,id=drive-scsi0-0-1-0,cache=unsafe -device scsi-hd,bus=scsi0.0,channel=0,scsi-id=1,lun=0,drive=drive-scsi0-0-1-0,id=scsi0-0-1-0 -chardev socket,id=charserial0,path=/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/console.sock -device isa-serial,chardev=charserial0,id=serial0 -chardev socket,id=charchannel0,path=/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/guestfsd.sock -device virtserialport,bus=virtio-serial0.0,nr=1,chardev=charchannel0,id=channel0,name=org.libguestfs.channel.0 -device virtio-balloon-pci,id=balloon0,bus=pci.0,addr=0x4 -msg timestamp=on
myself      13256  0.0  0.0  10564  1612 pts/5    S+   17:20   0:00 grep --color=auto qemu
myself:/vmw/ssdx> 

virsh zeigt uns auch Devices der virtuellen Maschine an; leider aber nicht Details:

myself:/vmw/ssdx> virsh
Willkommen bei virsh, dem interaktiven Virtualisierungsterminal.

Tippen Sie:  'help' für eine Hilfe zu den Befehlen
       'quit' zum Beenden

virsh # list
 Id    Name                           Status
----------------------------------------------------
 1     guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz       laufend

virsh # domblklist guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz
Ziel       Quelle
------------------------------------------------
sda        /tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/overlay1
sdb        /tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/overlay2

virsh # domblkinfo guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz sda
Kapazität:     4294967296
Zuordnung:      200704
Physisch:       196672

virsh # domblkinfo guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz sdb
Kapazität:     4294967296
Zuordnung:      1904640
Physisch:       1966080

Man kann auch noch rausbekommen, dass unser vmdk.file innerhalb der virtuellen Maschine mit /dev/sda assoziiert ist:

virsh # dumpxml guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz
<domain type='kvm' id='1' xmlns:qemu='http://libvirt.org/schemas/domain/qemu/1.0'>
  <name>guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz</name>
  <uuid>61273dde-6a1c-4c0a-be8d-ae06494041aa</uuid>
  <memory unit='KiB'>512000</memory>
  <currentMemory unit='KiB'>512000</currentMemory>
  <vcpu placement='static'>1</vcpu>
  <os>
    <type arch='x86_64' machine='pc-i440fx-2.9'>hvm</type>
    <kernel>/var/tmp/.guestfs-1004/appliance.d/kernel</kernel>
    <initrd>/var/tmp/.guestfs-1004/appliance.d/initrd</initrd>
    <cmdline>panic=1 console=ttyS0 udevtimeout=6000 udev.event-timeout=6000 no_timer_check acpi=off printk.time=1 cgroup_disable=memory root=/dev/sdb selinux=0 TERM=xterm-256color</cmdline>
    <boot dev='hd'/>
    <bios useserial='yes'/>
  </os>
  <cpu mode='host-passthrough' check='none'/>
  <clock offset='utc'>
    <timer name='rtc' tickpolicy='catchup'/>
    <timer name='pit' tickpolicy='delay'/>
    <timer name='hpet' present='no'/>
  </clock>
  <on_poweroff>destroy</on_poweroff>
  <on_reboot>destroy</on_reboot>
  <on_crash>destroy</on_crash>
  <devices>
    <emulator>/usr/bin/qemu-kvm</emulator>
    <disk type='file' device='disk'>
      <driver name='qemu' type='qcow2' cache='unsafe'/>
      <source file='/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/overlay1'/>
      <backingStore type='file' index='1'>
        <format type='raw'/>
        <source file='/vmw_win7/ssdx/Win7_x64_ssdx.vmdk'/>
        <backingStore/>
      </backingStore>
      <target dev='sda' bus='scsi'/>
      <alias name='scsi0-0-0-0'/>
      <address type='drive' controller='0' bus='0' target='0' unit='0'/>
    </disk>
    <disk type='file' device='disk'>
      <driver name='qemu' type='qcow2' cache='unsafe'/>
      <source file='/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/overlay2'/>
      <backingStore type='file' index='1'>
        <format type='raw'/>
        <source file='/var/tmp/.guestfs-1004/appliance.d/root'/>
        <backingStore/>
      </backingStore>
      <target dev='sdb' bus='scsi'/>
      <shareable/>
      <alias name='scsi0-0-1-0'/>
      <address type='drive' controller='0' bus='0' target='1' unit='0'/>
    </disk>
    <controller type='scsi' index='0' model='virtio-scsi'>
      <alias name='scsi0'/>
      <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x02' function='0x0'/>
    </controller>
    <controller type='usb' index='0' model='piix3-uhci'>
      <alias name='usb'/>
      <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x01' function='0x2'/>
    </controller>
    <controller type='pci' index='0' model='pci-root'>
      <alias name='pci.0'/>
    </controller>
    <controller type='virtio-serial' index='0'>
      <alias name='virtio-serial0'/>
      <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x03' function='0x0'/>
    </controller>
    <serial type='unix'>
      <source mode='connect' path='/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/console.sock'/>
      <target port='0'/>
      <alias name='serial0'/>
    </serial>
    <console type='unix'>
      <source mode='connect' path='/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/console.sock'/>
      <target type='serial' port='0'/>
      <alias name='serial0'/>
    </console>
    <channel type='unix'>
      <source mode='connect' path='/tmp/libguestfsi5ApZX/guestfsd.sock'/>
      <target type='virtio' name='org.libguestfs.channel.0' state='connected'/>
      <alias name='channel0'/>
      <address type='virtio-serial' controller='0' bus='0' port='1'/>
    </channel>
    <input type='mouse' bus='ps2'>
      <alias name='input0'/>
    </input>
    <input type='keyboard' bus='ps2'>
      <alias name='input1'/>
    </input>
    <memballoon model='virtio'>
      <alias name='balloon0'/>
      <address type='pci' domain='0x0000' bus='0x00' slot='0x04' function='0x0'/>
    </memballoon>
  </devices>
  <qemu:commandline>
    <qemu:env name='TMPDIR' value='/var/tmp'/>
  </qemu:commandline>
</domain>

 
Man beachte den zweiten Eintrag unter <devices> !

Das war es dann aber auch schon;

virsh # domfsinfo
Fehler: Befehl 'domfsinfo' erfordert <domain> Option
virsh # domfsinfo guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz
Fehler: Unable to get filesystem information
Fehler: argument unsupported: QEMU guest agent is not configured

Wie der programmierte Fuse-Prozess auf dem Host das QEMU-Gastsystem und das dort benutzten /dev/sda auf den mountpoint auf dem Host bringt, lässt sich mit einfachen Systemtools niocht weiter analysieren. Das /dev/fuse auf /mnt/vmdk gemountet wird, ist dabei eine wenig aussagekräftige Binsenweisheit:

myself:/vmw/ssdx> mount | grep fuse
fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw,relatime)
vmware-vmblock on /run/vmblock-fuse type fuse.vmware-vmblock (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=0,group_id=0,default_permissions,allow_other)
gvfsd-fuse on /run/user/1553/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1553,group_id=100)
/dev/fuse on /mnt/vmdk type fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1553,group_id=100)
myself:/vmw/ssdx> la /sys/fs/fuse/connections/47
insgesamt 0
dr-x------ 2 myself  users 0 13. Apr 17:20 .
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root  0 13. Apr 09:15 ..
--w------- 1 myself  users 0 13. Apr 17:20 abort
-rw------- 1 myself  users 0 13. Apr 17:20 congestion_threshold
-rw------- 1 myself  users 0 13. Apr 17:20 max_background
-r-------- 1 myself  users 0 13. Apr 17:20 waiting

Sicherheit - Zugriff durch andere User?

Die Informationsseiten zu "guestmount" versprechen Folgendes:

Other users cannot see the filesystem by default. .. If you mount a filesystem as one user (eg. root), then other users will not be able to see it by default. The fix is to add the FUSE allow_other option when mounting:
sudo guestmount [...] -o allow_other /mnt
and to enable this option in /etc/fuse.conf.

Eine nette Frage ist deshalb: Wie sicher ist denn der Zugang zu dem gemounteten Filesystem? Die angezeigten Rechte deuten eigentlich an, dass jeder zugreifen darf:

myself:/vmw/ssdx> la /mnt/vmdk
insgesamt 196128
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root      4096 28. Mär 19:53 .
drwxr-xr-x 5 root root      4096  8. Apr 11:14 ..
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root      4096 28. Mär 09:53 Cosmological_Voids
-rwxrwxrwx 2 root root 200822784  4. Nov 2013  mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root         0 28. Mär 09:52 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root         0 28. Mär 09:51 System Volume Information
drwxrwxrwx 1 root root         0 28. Mär 19:53 ufos

Das täuscht aber; den selbst als User "root" erlebt man Folgendes:

mytux:~ # la /mnt/vmdk
ls: cannot access '/mnt/vmdk': Permission denied
mytux:~ # la /mnt/
ls: cannot access '/mnt/vmdk': Permission denied
total 16
drwxr-xr-x  5 root root 4096 Apr  8 11:14 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root 4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwxr-xr-x  3 root root 4096 Mar 20  2017 bups
drwxr-xr-x  2 root root 4096 Apr  4  2017 tux
d?????????  ? ?    ?       ?            ? vmdk

Mit dieser Rechtesetzung kann nicht mal der User "root" was anfangen!

Also:

guestmount immer als unpriviligierter User ausführen!

(Auch wenn ich das selbst in den ersten Beispielen dieses Artikels selbst nicht gemacht habe.)

Apparmor als Security-Modell für die libguestfs-QEMU-Maschine wird leider (noch) ignoriert!

Die Tatsache, dass die libguestfs-Etwickler selbst darauf hinweisen, dass für die virtuelle libguestfs-Maschine sVirt und Sicherheitsregeln von SE-Linux/Apparmor zum Zuge kommen, weist uns auf 2 Dinge hin:

  • Wir sollten "guestmount" nicht als root ausführen, wenn das nicht zwingend nötig ist. Die Rechte an den vmdk-Files ändern wir ggf. entsprechend ab.
  • Wir sollten auf dem Linux-System, das wir für unsere Arbeiten verwenden, die Sicherheitseinstellungen für SELinux oder Apparmor prüfen!

Man kann "libvirt" auf einem Opensuse-System, auf dem Aparmor und nicht SE-Linux eingestzt wird, wie folgt konfigurieren: In der Datei "/etc/libvirt/qemu.conf" setzt man:

security_driver = "apparmor"
security_default_confined = 1
security_require_confined = 1

Zur Bedeutung dieser Parameter siehe die Erläuterungen im File selbst. Für normale virtuelle Maschinene funktioniert das auch; als Beispiel mag eine virtuelle Debian-Maschine dienen:

mytux:~ # ps aux | grep debian9
qemu     15096 14.2  0.2 9410692 193460 ?      Dl   17:51   0:08 /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 -machine accel=kvm -name guest=debian9,debug-threads=on -S -object secret,id=masterKey0,format=raw,file=/var/lib/libvirt/qemu/domain-1-debian9/master-key.aes ...
....
mytux~ # virsh 
Welcome to virsh, the virtualization interactive terminal.

Type:  'help' for help with commands
       'quit' to quit

virsh # list
 Id    Name                           State
----------------------------------------------------
 1     debian9                        running

virsh # dominfo debian9
Id:             1
Name:           debian9
UUID:           789498d2-e025-4f8e-b255-5a3ac0f9c965
OS Type:        hvm
State:          running
CPU(s):         3
CPU time:       16.4s
Max memory:     8388608 KiB
Used memory:    8388608 KiB
Persistent:     yes
Autostart:      disable
Managed save:   no
Security model: apparmor
Security DOI:   0
Security label: libvirt-789498d2-e025-4f8e-b255-5a3ac0f9c965 (enforcing)
virsh # 

Man beachte den korrekten Wert "apparmor" für das "Security model".

[Off topic: Man erkennt übrigens, dass libvirt die QEMU-Maschine dem user qemu zuordnet und selbst mit root-Rechten operiert, selbst wenn man die virtuelle Machine über virt-manager als unprivilegierter User startet.]

Aber für unsere vom User "myself" per guestmount gestartet Maschine liefert virsh:

myself:/vmw/ssdx> virsh
virsh # dominfo guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz
Id:             1
Name:           guestfs-7pup8sjqcmvakaoz
UUID:           61273dde-6a1c-4c0a-be8d-ae06494041aa
OS Typ:         hvm
Status:         laufend
CPU(s):         1
CPU-Zeit:       1,3s
Max Speicher:   512000 KiB
Verwendeter Speicher: 512000 KiB
Bleibend:       nein
Automatischer Start: deaktiviert
Verwaltete Sicherung: nein
Sicherheits-Modell: none
Sicherheits-DOI: 0

Schade, kein Sicherheitsmodell! Apparmor wird hier ignoriert, obwohl wir den Start der libguestfs-QEMU-Maschine an libvirtd deligiert hatten! Perfekt ist das libguestfs/guestmount an dieser Stelle also (noch!) nicht ...

Eine entsprechende Anfrage bei den libguestfs-Entwicklern habe ich übrigens gestartet. Siehe: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1564885

Konvertierung von vmdk-Disk-Images inkl. aller Snapshops und Extents in ein "raw-File" mit Hilfe von qemu-img

Wir kommen am Ende dieses Artikels nochmal auf das eingangs schon betrachtete Tool "qemu-img" zurück: Man kann "qemu-img" auch dazu verwenden, ein vmdk-Disk-Image in genau ein zusammenhängendes "raw-File" umzuwandeln. Das belegt dann allerdings den Plattenplatz, den die Extents bereits einnehmen.

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-img convert -f vmdk -O raw -S 4k Win7_x64_ssdx-000003.vmdk image_ssdx.raw
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la -h | grep image
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  4.0G Apr  7 14:46 image_ssdx.raw
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # du -h image_ssdx.raw 
2.2G    image_ssdx.raw

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # fdisk -l image_ssdx.raw
Disk image_ssdx.raw: 4 GiB, 4294967296 bytes, 8388608 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x0efb9e3e

Device          Boot   Start     End Sectors  Size Id Type
image_ssdx.raw1         2048 5312511 5310464  2.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
image_ssdx.raw2      5312512 8384511 3072000  1.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -o 2720006144 /dev/loop2 image_ssdx.raw 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/loop2 /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2
total 196128
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:52 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 20:25 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root      4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 09:53 Cosmological_Voids
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 20:26 Muflons
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:51 System Volume Information
-rwxrwxrwx  2 root root 200822784 Nov  4  2013 mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 31 15:26 ufos
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -d /dev/loop2

 
Die Berechnung des Offsets für das "losetup"-Kommando hatten wir schon in den letzten Artikeln besprochen. Die letzten zwei Kommandos drehen alles wieder zurück. Natürlich wird man bei Bedarf beim Mounten noch Einschränkungen der Zugriffsrechte vornehmen; siehe auch hierzu den letzten Artikel.

Vertraut der am Inhalt von vmdk-Files Interessierte/Forensiker also nicht auf "guestmount" oder "vmware-mount", kann er mit Hilfe von "qemu-img" zunächst immer ein raw-File erstellen, mit dem er dann nach Herzenslust herumwerkeln kann.

Ausblick

Im nächsten Artikel dieser Serie

Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host - IV - affuse, vdfuse

werfen wir einen kleinen (etwas entäuschenden) Blick auf "affuse" und "vdfuse".

Links

Infos zu libguestfs
http://libguestfs.org/
Manuals
http://libguestfs.org/guestfs.3.html
http://libguestfs.org/guestfs-security.1.html
https://rwmj.wordpress.com/2012/07/23/new-in-libguestfs-use-libvirt-to-launch-the-appliance/

guestmount
http://libguestfs.org/guestmount.1.html

Debian Packets
Deb-packets for libguestfs

qemu-img
managing-disk-images-with-qemu-img
https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/QEMU/Images
sles-12-book_virt-data-cha-qemu-guest-inst-qemu-img.html
https://jmutai.com/2017/03/06/qemu-img-cheatsheet-for-working-with-qemu-img/

Allgemeines
stackoverflow.com questions 22327728 mounting-vmdk-disk-image

Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host – III – qemu-nbd, loop-devices, kpartx

In dieser Artikelserie beschäftigen wir uns damit, wie man von einer Linux-Umgebung aus direkt auf Partitionen von vmdk-Disk-Images zugreifen kann. In den letzten beiden Artikeln

Mounten eines vmdk Laufwerks im Linux Host – I – vmware-mount
Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host – II – Einschub, Spezifikation, Begriffe

hatten wir zunächst das Kommando "vmware-mount" betrachtet. "vmware-mount" kann Partitionen in Snapshots eines "sparse and growing vmdk-Images" direkt auf Zielverzeichnisse eines Linux-Baums mounten. Wir hatten dabei gesehen, dass zwischenzeitlich ein sog. "flat"-File angelegt wird. Die Rechtesetzung beim Mounten hatte uns noch nicht besonders gefallen. Da vmdk-Format unterschiedliche und komplexe Varianten von bedarfsgerecht wachsenden Images und Snapshots erlaubt, hatten wir im zweiten Artikel ein paar Seitenblicke auf die Spezifikation geworfen, um die Vielzahl von vmdk-Dateien zu einem Disk-Image und die zugehörige Nomenklatur besser zu verstehen. Nun wollen wir ein erstes natives Linux-Tools betrachten.

Da "vmdk" mit Virtualisierung zu tun hat, ist es kein Wunder, dass die beste Unterstützung für dieses Format unter Linux aus dem QEMU-Bereich - und damit von Red Hat und aufgekauften Firmen - kommt. Eines der Tools, auf die dabei inzwischen Verlass ist, gibt es schon sehr lange (seit etwa 2010): qemu-nbd.

nbd steht dabei für Network Block Device; Ziel des nbd-Toolsets war es, virtuelle Speichermedien auch über Server - also über Netz - für qemu-basierte virtuelle Maschinen auf Client-Systemen (z.B. Linux-Workstations) bereitzustellen. Schön beschrieben sind die Grundlagen aus den Anfangszeiten etwa hier :
Qemu-Buch zu Network Block Devices
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_Block_Device

nbd kann aber natürlich auch lokal - also auf der eigenen Linux-Workstation - zur Erstellung eines Block-Devices auf Basis eines vmdk-Disk-Images eingesetzt werden. Das Kernelmodul "nbd" und das zugehörige CLI-Kommando "qemu-nbd" erweisen sich dabei als fähig, auch Snapshots des neuesten vmdk-Formats in der Version 6 richtig zu verarbeiten. Für die weitere Verwertung unter Linux werden - bei richtiger Parametrierung - ein oder mehrere ein Block-Devices erzeugt, die wir z.T. direkt mounten können.

Sicherheit und das direkte Mounten von virtuellen Disks/Filesystemen auf Linux-Hosts

Vorab ein paar mahnende Worte: vmdk, qcow2, etc. sind für virtuelle Maschinen gedacht. Gerade bei virtualisierten Windows-Maschinen, aber auch sonst, sollte man vorsichtig sein, wenn man nicht genau weiß, in welchem Zustand sich die Filesysteme des Images befinden. Ein manipuliertes Filesystem und/oder mit Malware behafteter Inhalt kann nach einem Mounten auch auf einem Linux-Host erheblichen Schaden anrichten. Leute, die etwas anderes glauben, erliegen einer Illusion.

Ich plädiere deshalb dafür, Experimente oder auch forensische Aktivitäten mit Partitionen aus vmdk-Images immer in einem virtuellen KVM-Linux-Gastsystem eines KVM-Hostes auszuführen. Das Gastsystem kann man hinreichend gut vom eigentlichen Virtualisierungs-Host isolieren. Die Performance ist auf aktuellen und SSD-basierten Systemen hinreichend gut, um auch mit großen vmdk-Images bequem hantieren zu können.

Wenn ich nachfolgend vom "Host" spreche, meine ich also immer das Linux-System, auf dem man mit dem vmdk-Image "forensisch" operiert - und nicht die virtuelle Maschine, die das Image normalerweise direkt nutzt und auch nicht den Virtualisierungshost. Ich meine vielmehr einen speziellen KVM-Linux-Gast, von dem aus man auf das Image zugreift. Die zu untersuchenden vmdk-Dateien kann man auf einem solchen Gast z.B. über SSHFS bereitstellen - oder sie bei hinreichendem Platz einfach per scp in das Gast-Filesystem hineinkopieren.

Man lese zu den Gefahren etwa:
A reminder why you should never mount guest disk images on the host OS von D.P. Berrange

Zudem gilt immer:
Mehrfache Mounts mit ggf. konkurrierenden schreibenden Zugriffen sind unbedingt zu vermeiden! Operiert man mit dem Image entgegen meinem Ratschlag direkt auf dem Virtualisierungshost, so muss das virtualisierte Gastsystem, das das Image normalerweise nutzt, abgeschaltet sein. Oder: Man mountet zur Sicherheit in einem "read only"-Modus.

Notwendige Pakete für qemu-nbd

Wer sich unter Linux - in meinem Fall Opensuse Leap - mit qemu und KVM auseinandersetzt, hat die notwendigen Pakete mit ziemlicher Sicherheit bereits installiert. Erforderlich ist das Paket "qemu-tools" (unter Debian-Derivaten "qemu-utils"). Abhängigkeiten werden durch YaST (oder apt-get) aufgelöst. Unter Opensuse Leap ist das Paket bereits im Standard-Update-Repository enthalten; alternativ kann man auf das Virtualization Repository zurückgreifen.

Unterstützte vmdk-Formate

qemu-nbd greift intern auf die Fähigkeiten von "qemu-img" zurück. Die Seite en.wikibooks.org-wiki-QEMU-Images informiert darüber, welche vmdk-Formate (neben vielen anderen Formaten) qemu-img in einer aktuellen Version (≥ 2.9) unterstützt:

vmdk:
VMware 3 & 4, or 6 image format, for exchanging images with that product

Das Interessante ist, dass qemu-nbd die vorgegebenen vmdk-Dateien zu Snapshots und zur vmdk-Base-Disk nach außen - also in Richtung Linux-User - zu einem Block-Device zusammenführt. qemu-nbd legt also einen Block-Layer über die komplexe vmdk-Adressierungsstruktur. Die Hauptarbeit leistet dabei ein Kernelmodul.

Dreisatz zur Anwendung von qemu-nbd

Drei Schritte sind notwendig, um zu dem gewünschten Block-Devices und darin enthaltenen Filesysteme zu mounten.

Schritt 1 - Kernel-Modul laden:
Zunächst muss das "nbd"-Kernel-Modul geladen werden. Die Seite "kernel.org-Documentation-zu-nb erläutert die möglichen Parameter. Dieselbe Info liefert natürlich auch "modinfo":

mytux:~ # modinfo nbd
filename:       /lib/modules/4.4.120-45-default/kernel/drivers/block/nbd.ko
license:        GPL
description:    Network Block Device
srcversion:     6F062B770FED9DC58072736
depends:        
retpoline:      Y
intree:         Y
vermagic:       4.4.120-45-default SMP mod_unload modversions 
signer:         openSUSE Secure Boot Signkey
sig_key:        03:32:FA:9C:BF:0D:88:BF:21:92:4B:0D:E8:2A:09:A5:4D:5D:EF:C8
sig_hashalgo:   sha256
parm:           nbds_max:number of network block devices to initialize (default: 16) (int)
parm:           max_part:number of partitions per device (default: 0) (int)

In meinem Testfall erwarte ich maximal 4 (NTFS/FAT-) Partitionen pro vmdk-Device, also:

mytux:/etc # modprobe nbd max-part=4
mytux:/etc # 

Schritt 2 - nbd-Device wählen und mit dem Disk-Image verknüpfen:
Defaultmäßig hält Linux 15 potentielle nbd-Devices unter dem Verzeichnis "/dev" vor. Nun muss ein solches "nbd"-Block-Device natürlich noch mit einem Disk-Image verbunden werden. Wurde das Device "/dev/nbdx" - alos z.B. "/dev/nbd0" - noch nicht anderweitig benutzt, können wir es mit einem Disk-Image mittels der "-c" (= --connect) Option des Kommandos "<strong>qemu-nbd</strong>" zusammenführen.

Vorher müssen wir ein geeignetes Image wählen. Leser meines letzten Artikels wissen, dass auf meinem (selbst virtualisierten) Linux-System ein Testverzeichnis mit Dateien eines Win7-Gastes einer VMware-Umgebung existiert. Das Verzeichnis beinhaltet u.a. den zweiten Snapshot eines growable, sparse vmdk-Disk-Images zu einer Disk "Win7_x64_ssdx". Um es noch komplizierter zu machen, befinden sich die ursprüngliche Deskriptor-Datei und die zugehörigen Extent-Dateien (inkl. der ursprünglichen Basis-Datei) in einem anderen Verzeichnis "/vmw/Win7".

Das Verzeichnis "/vmw/Win7Test/" beinhaltet dagegen die Delta-Dateien (Deskriptor und Extents):

mytux:/vmwssd_w7prod/Win7_x64 # la | grep ssdx
-rw------- 1 myself  users    1507328 Mar 28 20:26 Win7_x64_ssdx-000001-s001.vmdk
-rw------- 1 myself  users      65536 Mar 28 19:54 Win7_x64_ssdx-000001-s002.vmdk
-rw------- 1 myself  users        370 Mar 28 20:24 Win7_x64_ssdx-000001.vmdk
-rw------- 1 myself  users     851968 Mar 29 10:38 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002-s001.vmdk
-rw------- 1 myself  users      65536 Mar 28 20:26 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002-s002.vmdk
-rw------- 1 myself  users      10240 Mar 29 10:37 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk

Die Verlinkung zu den Ursprungsdateien unter "/vmw/Win7"

mytux:/vmwssd_w7prod/Win7_x64 # la /vmw/Win7/ | grep ssdx
-rw-------  1 myself  users 2344157184 Mar 28 19:53 Win7_x64_ssdx-s001.vmdk
-rw-------  1 myself  users     131072 Mar 27 19:37 Win7_x64_ssdx-s002.vmdk
-rw-------  1 myself  users        511 Mar 28 19:51 Win7_x64_ssdx.vmdk

ist, wie wir aus dem vorhergehenden Artikel wissen, natürlich über Verweise in den Deskriptor-Dateien Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk und Win7_x64_ssdx-000001.vmdk der Snapshots festgelegt.

Kommt qemu-nbd mit dieser komplexen Struktur klar? Ja - und wir müssen dabei nur die richtige Deskriptor-Datei angeben ...

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-nbd -c /dev/nbd0 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /dev | grep nbd0
brw-rw----   1 root disk       43,   0 Mar 30 14:51 nbd0
brw-rw----   1 root disk       43,   1 Mar 30 14:51 nbd0p1
brw-rw----   1 root disk       43,   2 Mar 30 14:51 nbd0p2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # fdisk -l /dev/nbd0
Disk /dev/nbd0: 4 GiB, 4294967296 bytes, 8388608 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x0efb9e3e

Device      Boot   Start     End Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/nbd0p1         2048 5312511 5310464  2.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/nbd0p2      5312512 8384511 3072000  1.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # # 

Das, was hier so selbstverständlich aussieht, ist angesichts der Komplexität des vmdk-Formats eigentlich ein kleines Wunder. Man beachte, dass hier keine irgendwie geartete Kopie der vmdk-Disk in einem neuen Format erzeugt wurde. Vielmehr arbeiten wir auf den originalen Daten - deren Adressierung über eine Block-Layer-Schicht vermittelt wird. Dafür setzt qemu-nbd meines Wissens auch nicht FUSE ein (unix.stackexchange.com-questions-192875/qemu-nbd-vs-vdfuse-for-mounting-vdi-images)

Schritt 3 - Mounten:
So, wie wir qemu-nbd hier verwendet haben, ist es sehr zuvorkommend zu uns und weist neben dem Block-Device "/dev/nbd0" für die gesamte Disk gleich auch noch weitere Block-Devices für die intern erkannten Partitionen des Disk-Images aus. Letztere können wir direkt mounten:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/nbd0p2 /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2
total 196128
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:52 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 20:25 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root      4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 09:53 Cosmological_Voids
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 20:26 Muflons
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:51 System Volume Information
-rwxrwxrwx  2 root root 200822784 Nov  4  2013 mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 29 10:37 ufos

Zugriffs-Rechte und deren Abänderung

Ähnlich wie bei "vmware-mount", das wir im ersten Artikel dieser Serie behandelt hatten, bekommen wir je nach Zweck der vmdk-Untersuchung ggf. ein Problem mit Rechten - siehe die durchgehenden 777-Rechte-Kämme nach dem Mounten. Im Fall von qemu-nbd können wir das aber rechtzeitig im Zuge des Mountens korrigieren.

Dabei ist - je nach Untersuchungszweck - die Frage zu stellen: Wer soll welche Art von Zugriff erhalten und wie privilegiert soll derjenige sein? Ich zeige mal 2 Varianten. (Für das genauere Verständnis sollte man sich mit Mount-Optionen und umasks bzw. fmasks und dmasks befassen.)

Variante 1: Nur Root soll rein lesenden Zugang erhalten:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount -o uid=root,gid=root,umask=0277 /dev/nbd0p2 /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2
total 196128                                                                                                                        
dr-x------  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:52 $RECYCLE.BIN/                                                                        
dr-x------  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 20:25 ./                                                                                   
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root      4096 Mar 28 17:02 ../
dr-x------  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 09:53 Cosmological_Voids/
dr-x------  1 root root         0 Mar 28 20:26 Muflons/
dr-x------  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:51 System Volume Information/
-r-x------  2 root root 200822784 Nov  4  2013 mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi*
dr-x------  1 root root         0 Mar 29 10:37 ufos/

Variante 2: Nur der User "myself" soll lesenden und schreibenden Zugang zu Dateien und Directories des gemounteten NTFS-Systems erhalten:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount -o uid=rmx,gid=users,fmask=0177,dmask=0077 /dev/nbd0p2 /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2
total 196128
drwx------  1 myself  users         0 Mar 28 09:52 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwx------  1 myself  users      4096 Mar 28 20:25 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root       4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwx------  1 myself  users      4096 Mar 28 09:53 Cosmological_Voids
drwx------  1 myself  users         0 Mar 28 20:26 Muflons
drwx------  1 myself  users         0 Mar 28 09:51 System Volume Information
-rw-------  2 myself  users 200822784 Nov  4  2013 mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi
drwx------  1 myself  users         0 Mar 29 10:37 ufos
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Die Linux-Rechte sagen allerdings wenig darüber aus, wem ggf. neu angelegte Dateien mit welchen Rechten dann später welchem User auf einem virtuellen Windows gehören würden. Siehe zu dieser Thematik den entsprechenden Abschnitt und zugehörige Links im ersten Artikel der Serie.

Unmounten und Entfernen der Beziehung eines nbd-Devices zum Disk-Image

Nachdem man die Untersuchung einer Partition des vmdk-Disk-Images unter Linux abgeschlossen hat, muss man alles wieder rückgängig machen. Das geht wie folgt:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-nbd -d /dev/nbd0 
/dev/nbd0 disconnected
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # rmmod nbd
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Den umount-Befehl muss man natürlich für alle ggf. gemounteten Partitionen absetzen.

Nutzung von Loop-Devices?

nbd war deshalb sehr hilfsbereit, weil wir beim Laden des Kernelmoduls vorgegeben hatten, wieviele Partitionen maximal verwaltet werden sollen. Frage: Können wir die Partitionen auch anders bekommen, wenn wir etwa den Parameter des Kernelmoduls weglassen? Antwort: Ja, das geht.

Ich möchte zwei Varianten vorstellen, die sich nicht nur auf nbd-Devices, sondern in gleicher Weise auch auf raw- oder flat-Files, die man etwa als Output von "vmware-mount -f" erhalten würde, anwenden lassen.

Die erste Methode nutzt Loop-Devices. Loop- oder Loopback-Devices kennt der Linux-Anwender normalerweise im Zusammenhang mit mit der Nutzung von Filesystemen, die von Raw-Dateien beherbergt werden. Man vergisst dabei oft, dass sich Loop-Devices auch Block-Devices überstülpen lassen; die man-Page zu "losetup" sagt dazu:

DESCRIPTION
losetup is used to associate loop devices with regular files or block devices, to detach loop devices, and to query the status of a loop device.

Letztlich ist unter Linux/Unix halt alles ein File :-). Also:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # modprobe nbd
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-nbd -c /dev/nbd0 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /dev | grep nbd0
brw-rw----   1 root disk       43,   0 Mar 31 15:19 nbd0

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # fdisk -l /dev/nbd0
Disk /dev/nbd0: 4 GiB, 4294967296 bytes, 8388608 sectors
Units: sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
Disklabel type: dos
Disk identifier: 0x0efb9e3e

Device      Boot   Start     End Sectors  Size Id Type
/dev/nbd0p1         2048 5312511 5310464  2.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
/dev/nbd0p2      5312512 8384511 3072000  1.5G  7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

Nun müssen wir noch die Offsets der Partitionen in Bytes aus den Start und End-Sektoren berechnen:

Offset Partition 1: 2048 * 512 = 1048576
Offset Partition 2: 5312512 * 512 = 2720006144

Diese Offset-Positionen sind dann über die Option "-o" im losetup-Kommando anzugeben:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -o 1048576 /dev/loop1 /dev/nbd0
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -o 2720006144 /dev/loop2 /dev/nbd0
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/loop1 /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/loop2 /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2
total 8
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root    0 Mar 27 19:35 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root 4096 Mar 27 19:35 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root 4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root    0 Mar 27 19:34 System Volume Information

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # touch /mnt2/hallo.txt
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt2
total 8
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root    0 Mar 27 19:35 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root 4096 Mar 31 15:24 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root 4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root    0 Mar 27 19:34 System Volume Information
-rwxrwxrwx  1 root root    0 Mar 31 15:24 hallo.txt

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt3
total 196128
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:52 $RECYCLE.BIN
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 20:25 .
drwxr-xr-x 39 root root      4096 Mar 28 17:02 ..
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root      4096 Mar 28 09:53 Cosmological_Voids
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 20:26 Muflons
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 28 09:51 System Volume Information
-rwxrwxrwx  2 root root 200822784 Nov  4  2013 mysql-installer-community-5.6.14.0.msi
drwxrwxrwx  1 root root         0 Mar 31 14:02 ufos
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # cat /mnt3/ufos/ufo.txt
Ufos are not real
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test #

Zurückdrehen können wir den gesamten Prozess wie folgt:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -d /dev/loop2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -d /dev/loop1
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-nbd -d /dev/nbd0 
/dev/nbd0 disconnected
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # modprobe -r nbd
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Loop-Devices und "vmware-mount -f"
Das Ganze klappt natürlich auch mit "vmware-mount -f" und dem dadurch erzeugten "flat"-File (s. den ersten Artikel):

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # vmware-mount -f Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk /mnt/vmdk
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /mnt/vmdk
total 4194304
-rw------- 1 myself users 4294967296 Mar 31 15:25 flat
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -o 2720006144 /dev/loop2 /mnt/vmdk/flat 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/loop2 /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # cat /mnt3/ufos/ufo.txt 
Ufos are not real
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # losetup -d /dev/loop2
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # vmware-mount -d /mnt/vmdk
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test #

Über diesen Weg können wir übrigens auch das Problem mit den Zugriffsrechten lösen, dass wir im ersten Artikel für "vmware_mount" angesprochen hatten - wir legen die Rechte analog zum oben besprochenen Vorgehen im Zuge des mount-Befehls fest.

kpartx?

Erfahrene Linux-User wissen, dass kpartx ein nettes Tool ist, das aus Block-Devices oder Raw-Files evtl. enthaltene Partitionstabellen ermittelt und über "/dev/mapper" entsprechende Devices bereitstellt. Das funktioniert natürlich auch auf Basis von "/dev/nbdX"-Devices:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # modprobe nbd
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-nbd -c /dev/nbd0 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # kpartx -av /dev/nbd0 
add map nbd0p1 (254:12): 0 5310464 linear 43:0 2048
add map nbd0p2 (254:13): 0 3072000 linear 43:0 5312512    
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /dev/mapper | grep nbd0
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root       8 Mar 31 15:58 nbd0p1 -> ../dm-12
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root root       8 Mar 31 15:53 nbd0p2 -> ../dm-13
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/dm-13 /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # cat /mnt3/ufos/ufo.txt
Ufos are not real
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # kpartx -d /dev/nbd0
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # la /dev/mapper | grep nbd0
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # modprobe -r nbd
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Analog für ein flat-File von vmware-mount:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # vmware-mount -f Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk /mnt/vmdk
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # kpartx -av /mnt/vmdk/flat 
add map loop0p1 (254:12): 0 5310464 linear 7:0 2048
add map loop0p2 (254:13): 0 3072000 linear 7:0 5312512
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/dm-13 /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # cat /mnt3/ufos/ufo.txt
Ufos are not real
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # umount /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # kpartx -d /mnt/vmdk/flat
loop deleted : /dev/loop0
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # vmware-mount -d /mnt/vmdk
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Alles gut !

Read-Only-Option?

In allen oben dargestellten Beispielen haben wir bislang durchgehend rw-Mounts durchgeführt. Da ist bei vielen Analysen nicht erwünscht. Grundsätzlich ist im Umgang mit Partitionen regelmäßig Vorsicht angebracht, um nichts zu zerstören. Write-´Zugriffe sollte man immer zuerst auf Kopien testen.

Daher stellt sich die Frage nach einer "ro"-Option von "qemu-nbd". Die gibt es, sie lautet "-r". Deren Setzung schlägt auf alle weiteren Maßnahmen durch:

mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # modprobe nbd max-part=4
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # qemu-nbd -r -c /dev/nbd0 Win7_x64_ssdx-000002.vmdk 
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount /dev/nbd0p2 /mnt3
fuse: mount failed: Permission denied
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # mount -o ro /dev/nbd0p2 /mnt3
mytux:/vmw/Win7Test # 

Gibt es Größenlimit für die virtuelle Disk?

Ehrlich gesagt: keine Ahnung. Wenn es ein aktuelles Limit gibt, würde ich aufgrund älterer Infos im Zusammenhang mit nbd auf 1TB tippen. Wenn jemand was Genaueres weiß, kann er mir ja eine Mail schreiben. Siehe auch:

vsphere-50 und vddk
vddk51_programming.pdf

Fazit und Ausblick

Das nbd-Kernelmodul und das Kommando qemu-nbd eröffnen relativ einfache Zugänge zu komplexen vmdk-Image-Dateien. Dabei wird auch die aktuelle Version 6 des vmdk-Formats beherrscht. Wir haben zudem die Möglichkeit, das Mounten der bereitgestellten nbd-Block-Devices bzgl. der Rechte individuell zu gestalten.

Im nächsten Artikel

Mounten eines vmdk-Laufwerks im Linux Host – IV – guestmount, virt-filesystems, qemu-img

gehe ich kurz auf "qemu-img" ein und betrachte dann das Kommando "guestmount" aus der neueren und Fuse-basierten Toolkiste von "libguestfs".

Links

losetup - Abkürzung für bestimmte mknod-Operationen zur Nutzung von Loop-Devices
unix.stackexchange.com/questions/98742/how-to-add-more-dev-loop-devices-on-fedora-19

qemu-nbd
https://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/QEMU/
https://opsech.io/posts/2017/Jun/07/how-to-mount-vm-disk-images-on-fedora.html
http://blog.vmsplice.net/2011/02/how-to-access-virtual-machine-image.html
https://sweetcode.io/introduction-to-linux-network-block-devices/